VistA License debate: its about proprietarization

It looks like WorldVistA is, for now, holding fast to the GPL and AGPL for VistA licensing. I have been a vocal advocate for compromising with DSS and Open Health Tools around the LGPL. The LGPL would allow for some innovations to be licensed under the GPL, and others, in the core of VistA to be compatible to bundle with proprietary software.

Recently, Skip McGaughey was quoted in modernhealthcare as saying:

“I believe it’s all about community-building,” McGaughey said. “I believe people have focused too much on technology and licenses and they need to focus on the care of individuals. If we can switch the focus from licensing and technology—the VistA community has a tremendous opportunity to fundamentally alter care throughout the world.”

“They’re starting from a base that has a tremendous knowledge base, built by care providers, tested and modified over a long period of time,” McGaughey said. “So, the opportunity is tremendous. So what we have to do is change the focus and quit worrying about the individual ‘me’ and talk about the ‘we’ together,” he said.

“If we enable an environment for people to collaborate in building infrastructure that everybody can use, to share the expense, what we can do is build the integration and interoperability and build a collaborative spirit,” McGaughey said. “Then people can climb the value stack to provide added value that can make money.”

It should be noted that I was not at the talk and did not hear exactly what Skip said. I know Skip and I know that he is a good guy, I think he intended to bring a message of reconciliation regarding licensing which is very good.  I may actually agree with Skip’s position, but I cannot agree with this quote. While I am in favor of compromising with Open Health Tools, the position of WorldVistA on insisting on the full GPL is not unreasonable and it is certainly not anti-people.

Lets be clear, when you talk about proprietary friendly licenses in medicine, you are not talking about a way for people to “make money” or “earn a living”, you are talking about a mechanism that traps software consumers into a monopoly relationship with a software provider.  Proprietary software in healthcare is so famous for abusing this monopoly position to the detriment of its clients that the issue is being investigated by congress and is even the subject of in-depth lampooning.

To trivialize licensing and indicate that is about “people” is typical and insincere. The software license defines the basic power structure of a relationship between software developer and software consumer. Full copyleft ensures that the developer and the consumer are always equals. Proprietary licenses ensure that the software vendor is in control. Open Source licenses that allow for proprietarization are a grey area. If software consumers are careful only to use Open Source components, they can maintain a balance of power, but if they ever allow a proprietary module into their ecosystem, then the license for that module puts some vendor back in the drivers seat.

If there was an “open” movement in the prisons around the world so that all prisoners were limited to just one shackle, they would still remain prisoners. Similarly as long as one software vendor can dictate terms to a clinic or hospital, they have a problem. Proprietary vendors who do not abuse their clients are like kind wardens. Just because they are nice a prisoner, does not change the fundamental power dynamic in the relationship.

The LGPL is a compromise precisely because it allows people who value freedom to work with people who are willing to compromise with proprietary vendors.

When you start hearing people saying things like “value stack” and “let people make money”, you are hearing the argument that being trapped is sometimes OK, if what you get for it is worth it.

This kind of power dynamic is precisely what prevents communities from trusting each other and cooperating. If you want to create community, you better not ignore licensing concerns.

-FT

One thought on “VistA License debate: its about proprietarization”

  1. Love the links.

    I think the senator should have sent that to a few more software vendors.

    Something else to look at? Software vendors are partnering with clearing houses.

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